Charities begin to feel the benefit of contactless

The contactless payment revolution has had a big impact on the lives of millions of consumers, and it appears that charities will soon feel the benefit too.

In the UK, Barclaycard recently conducted a trial of 100 portable charity donation boxes capable of receiving both EMV chip and contactless payments. The devices are able to accept funds from wearable and mobile devices.

Launched in September 2016, the trial involved 11 national charities. The organizations were able to use the lightweight boxes in whatever way best suited their needs, from having them carried around by volunteers to placing them at charity store checkouts.

The end result was more than £20,000 ($24,980) in contributions from the public, including one payment of £1,000 to the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.

Barclaycard said the responses from the people who donated were positive. Some of the participating charities have continued to use the boxes, despite the trial officially ending in December.

Paulette Rowe, managing director of Barclaycard Payment Solutions, said: “In today’s world there are more ways to pay than ever before. The donation boxes that we trialed enable charities to tap into these new options, raising more money no matter how their donors choose to give – whether that’s with cash, through a mobile device or by using a debit or credit card.”

Making the most of innovations like this could become increasingly important for charities. Research by Barclaycard found that 15 percent of people walked away from a donation opportunity at least once a year because they couldn’t pay by card.

As far as contactless is concerned, all the signs point towards this technology playing an increasingly significant role in the payments system over the coming years.

In November 2016, Retail Banking Research published figures showing that contactless payments in Europe had trebled during 2015. The firm predicted that, by 2021, one in five card payments will be contactless.

Written by Jack Dougal